Friday, February 1, 2019

Alike yet Different

found on FaceBook
Homophones were often confusing for my Language Arts (English) students.

Can you think of any homophones (words that sound alike but are spelled differently) i.e., two, to, too; beat, beet; there, their, they're.

Think about it a bit . . . before checking this helpful list.

11 comments:

  1. Bear and bare! See and sea! Time and thyme!

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  2. Wait and weight. Wrote and rote. Doe and dough. Pea and pee. Steel and steal.

    (It was fun to come up with some.)

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  3. My 4th grade teacher had a contest in her class to see who could come up with the longest list of homophones. Their, they're, there = one of my biggest pet peeves when reading things written by supposedly educated adults. Especially in light of spell check.

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  4. Fair and Fare. Wear and ware (and sometimes where depending on how folks pronounce it - lol). Hair and Hare. Tail and Tale - finally a pair that don't sound like (rhyme) with the others I listed. Oh, and Mail and Male.

    A fun exercise Nancy!

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  5. I was a first grade teacher so you know I had to wrestle with this all the time. Kid's could never believe how things were spelled. Made no sense to them and I have to say me either.

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  6. i read this before and I 'll read this again.

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  7. Plain and plane--just had the discussion about this with my kindergarten grandson! "But the sound the same!!!!"

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  8. Well I thought I was fairly good at English, but as I’m reading everyone else’s comments I can’t think of anymore, although I know there are probably several more. It’s one of my pet peeves when I read things written by people who are supposed to be educated, especially newspapers, and they have used words completely incorrectly. I can imagine it’s even worse for a former teacher! Blessings, Betsy

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  9. And then there are the ones that are spelled the same but the meaning depends on the context. like tear (rip) and tear (cry) or my favorite sewer(a person who sews) and sewer (part of a drainage system)?

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  10. I always liked whether and weather.

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